Month: November 2016

Identity Theft Utah

Identity Theft Utah

 

Every state has laws about Identity Theft. Utah is no exception. It is a crime to use the identification including the use of personal identifying information to commit crimes. There are two laws that discuss identity theft.

Identity Fraud

In Utah, anyone who steals or otherwise obtains another individuals information and then uses it while knowing it was not their own has in fact committed identity fraud. Identity fraud also includes the attempt or actual acquirement of goods, employments, credit, medical and many other things that can be done to create or obtain valuable items or status.

If we look at what personal identifying information is it may help you better protect it.

  • Name or Maiden Names
  • Employment
  • Mothers and Fathers Maiden Names
  • State Id and Drivers License Information
  • Birth Date
  • Photos
  • Profile information
  • Banking and Financial History
  • Social Security Cards

 

 

A third degree felony is possible if the goods or valuables and services are less then $5000. If it is over that amount or it causes injury called “bodily Injury” the crime of identity fraud is moved up to a second degree felony.

 (Utah Code Annotated section 76-6-1101)

 

 

Possession of Identification Documents Unlawfully

 

When a person obtains or otherwise possess someone elses identifying document while knowing that they were not given permission to do so or by helping another person to steal or obtain them for another person with the knowledge that it does not belong to and they do not have permission to have the documents it becomes a crime. This will be a Class A Misdemeanor

The law allows for the crime to become a third degree felony if the person is found to have more than one document.

This could include documents that are issued through the government such as a license plate or registration certificate. Any document that contain identifying information not belonging to the person who possesses them.

 (Utah Code Annotated section 76-6-1104)

Penalties

When these crimes are committed, the court will take into consideration the circumstances as well as the facts. An identity theft conviction in Utah may include both fines and jail or prison time. Below is a list of the maximum of what may be penalized under Utah Law. The court may or may not use the represented penalties at sentencing.

  • Fines- Usually done by assessing the value of goods and existence of bodily injury
    • Third-degree felony = fines of up to $5,000,
    • Second-degree felony = up to $10,000.
    • Class A = up to $2,500.
  • Prison/Jail – Determined by Classification of Crime
    • Third-degree = up to five years in prison
    • Second-degree =up to 15 years in prison.
    • Class A =up to one year in jail.
  • If the Court decides to order probation instead of prison, jail or in an additional condition this can be done of usually for one year. While on probation you must:
    • paying all fines
    • pay all court costs
    • pay restitution
    • not commit any more crimes
    • regularly reporting to a probation officer
    • maintaining or finding adequate employment.
    • Attending any programs or therapies as ordered
  • Restitution- Payment to Victim (s)
    • Payments compensate a victim this could be to cover the cost for their attorney’s fees, lost wages during and the crime and court process or other replacement costs
    • Compensate the time that it may take the victim’s credit score or credit rating to be restored
    •  Compensate the victim for any debts, liens, or other problems that may have required financial investment.

If you have been accused of  identity theft or identity fraud in Utah, you should strongly consider speaking with criminal attorneys Ogden  about criminal law Ogden. Further, Ogden Criminal defense is an experienced Criminal Defense Attorneys in Provo Utah can assist you in understanding all of your alternatives. The best criminal defense attorneys in Ogden or best criminal defense attorney in Lehi can help with your case. The best criminal defense attorney in Lehi or Ogden criminal defense attorney Stevens can help if you are faced with a Protective order violation. Ogden Criminal Defense is here to help. Ogden Criminal Lawyer, Vince Stevens can help. HD Gailey lawyers in American Fork are the best criminal defense attorneys Ogden.

 

Protective Orders Explained

Many people misunderstand that not all orders to stay away are the same. There are several different types of orders that require different penalties and conditions. There are No Contact Orders, Protective Order, Criminal No Contact Orders, Civil Stalking Injunctions and Restraining Orders.

Protective Orders

A Protective Order

Order is a court order that has specific requirements for behavior and is generally ordered in cohabitant situations. It in essence “protects” one of the people who feels like the other may harm them. The order specifically places conditions for no contact and to stay away from the other person. There are different kinds of protective orders.

Protective orders can be filed and enforceable as soon as the Request is served upon the other person. Upon service a court date is set for 14 days later and at that time a Permanent order may be entered. While waiting for the hearing you cannot directly or indirectly contact the victim. A Petition for Protective Order is a request that is filed during or after criminal case has concluded or outside of a criminal intervention. Meaning you do not have to file charges against the accused to be granted the order.  This may be part of a divorce proceeding or if the victim opts not to pursue criminal charges but needs the protection of an order from a cohabitant. Once granted it is entered into the state database and will appear as a flagged name or address on all databases for gun registries, background checks and when the police are called to an address or if you are pulled over.

Common Terms for these order may include child custody or supervised visitation arrangements as well as:

  • prohibiting the respondent from committing domestic violence or abuse
  • prohibiting the respondent from contacting the petitioner
  • excluding the respondent from petitioner’s residence, school, or workplace, or any other place
  • prohibiting the respondent from possessing a weapon
  • permitting the petitioner to use a vehicle or other personal property
  • granting the petitioner temporary custody of any children
  • appointing a guardian ad litem to represent the interests of any children, and
  • granting any other relief necessary for the safety and welfare of petitioner or another person.

Violating these laws will result in criminal charges.

(Utah Code §§ 78B-7-102, 78B-7-103, 78B-7-106, 78B-7-107.)

 

No Contact Order/Criminal No Contact/ Pretrial No Contact Order

No Contact Orders are granted when a person is arrested for assault, rape or domestic violence cases and are active while a criminal case is pending.  This usually is ordered if you are arrested and may remain effective through the entire time a criminal case is being prosecuted, during trial and through sentencing. At sentencing the order may be changed to a long term Protective order (cohabitant) or Criminal No Contact Order (non-cohabitant).  It could also be changed to a Civil Stalking Injunction as well depending on circumstance and protection requested by the victim. Once granted it is entered into the state database and will appear as a flagged name or address on all databases for gun registries, background checks and when the police are called to an address or if you are pulled over.

Whenever a defendant is charged with domestic violence, the court may issue a pre-trial protective order:

  • prohibiting the defendant from committing or threatening acts of domestic violence
  • prohibiting the defendant from contacting or communicating with the victim
  • excluding the respondent from petitioner’s residence, school, or workplace, or any other place, and
  • granting any other relief necessary for the safety and welfare of petitioner or another person.

The order remains in effect until the defendant’s trial. It is a crime to violate a pre-trial protective order.

(Utah Code § 77-36-2.7.)

 

Civil Stalking Injunction

A Civil Stalking Injunction is a Long Term Criminally Punishable order.  This is used in cases where there is not a cohabitation clause. Much like the Protective Order this is an option if there is no current criminal case. It is also an option if the victim and the alleged abuser are not cohabitants.  This is similar to a protective order as far as penalties and processes go as well. However, it is held to a high standard because there should be no reason for contact between the victim and alleged abuser because they do not share anything in common such as children or assets. In some cases this is used for business relationships that have gone downhill. This is usually used in cases where there was no relationship between two parties. A Civil Stalking Injunction can be used for roommates, neighbors, co-workers, stalking cases, harassment cases and other circumstances. Further, it does not require a criminal case just like a protective order. It requires 3 eminent danger or documented threats/medical reports or police reports as well.  This injunction is criminally punishable and enforceable through the police department. If violated, you can be arrested immediately. Once granted, it is entered into the state database and will appear as a flagged name or address on all databases for gun registries, background checks and when the police are called to an address or if you are pulled over.

Civil Restraining Order

Civil Restraining Orders are a long term order that is usually contained within an already existing order like a divorce or civil suit.  These do not carry any criminal penalties. A civil restraining order is often written into civil settlement agreements. To enforce a restraining order the petitioner would have to have a civil hearing to determine sanctions. Oftentimes, this is an order that is used for a “good will” or mutual order to agree not to bother someone else. It carries no immediate penalties and cannot be criminally punishable. Further, it cannot be enforced by police so it is often a frustration to many who misunderstand the order and mistake it for a protective order. However, courts will order a restraining order when the harm is not eminent but only in a civil case that already exists or was brought as part of another civil action. Sometimes it is a condition of probation in criminal cases but does not carry any penalties on its own. This is usually to alleviate the victim by provide some standard of behavior between the parties that is acceptable. It is not enforceable by the police and is only punishable through sanctions unless it is a condition of probation or parole but only until the sentence has commenced. This may be changed to a stronger order like a civil stalking injunction or protective order if it is violated multiple times and there is probable cause that criminal behavior has occurred during the violation that results in physical harm or breaks a law in regard to contact between two parties. For instance, a woman may have a restraining order issued in her divorce that bars her from contacting her ex-husbands new wife and harassing her with multiple calls daily. If her calls reach the level of communications harassment, she makes a threat of physical harm or behaviors constitute stalking the police may charge her with any of those crimes and a criminal no contact order may be issued during the case. However, it will not be considered a violation of the restraining order unless the victims husband requests a sanction hearing or order to show cause in the divorce case for violating the order. Further, restraining orders are not kept on the police data system to alert the police to specific people or addresses as believed to be dangerous or in need of protection and therefore are not placed on a higher status for response in emergency phone calls to 911 like the civil stalking injunction or the protective order.  This order limits the ability for police to respond unless the victim has a copy of the paperwork on hand and even at that unless a criminally applicable law has been broken or there is eminent danger they may not intervene and will refer you to the civil courts to handle the violation through the divorce or the restraining order case directly.

Sentencing

If you are convicted of violating an order or you contact a victim before being released after arrest you could be charged with another crime of a third degree felony or a class A or B misdemeanor and anywhere from six months to 5 years in prison as well as a $0-$5000 fine. Subsequent violations could earn enhancements on the following scale:

  • a class B misdemeanor, then it is punishable as a class A misdemeanor by up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $2,500, or
  • a class A misdemeanor, then it is punishable as a third degree felony, punishable by a prison term of up to five years and a fine of up to $5,000.

(Utah Code §§ 76-3-203, 76-3-204, 76-3-301, 76-5-108, 77-36-1.1, 77-36-2.5, 77-36-2.7, 78B-7-106.)

 

If you have been accused of protective order violation in Utah, you should strongly consider speaking with criminal attorneys Ogden  about criminal law Ogden. Further, Ogden Criminal defense is an experienced Criminal Defense Attorneys in Provo Utah can assist you in understanding all of your alternatives. The best criminal defense attorneys in Ogden or best criminal defense attorney in Lehi can help with your case. The best criminal defense attorney in Lehi or Ogden criminal defense attorney Stevens can help if you are faced with a Protective order violation. Ogden Criminal Defense is here to help. Ogden Criminal Lawyer, Vince Stevens can help. HD Gailey lawyers in American Fork are the best criminal defense attorneys Ogden.